Addiction Recovery

Addiction Recovery

Addiction is a chronic disorder of the brain. It is not a moral failing or personal weakness.

Addiction RecoveryAccording to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, when a person can't stop taking a drug or drinking alcohol even if he/she wants to, it's called addiction. The urge is too strong to control, even if he/she know the drug is causing harm.

Addiction is a disease, just as diabetes is disease. Diabetes is often treated with a combination of medication, patient education and lifestyle changes. This same model may be applied to the treatment of substance use disorders. Our providers are dedicated to providing evidence based psychological treatment to help our patients overcome addiction. We believe that combining an integrative approach to treatment, such as counseling, patient education, hard work and commitment to sobriety offers the best possible opportunity for sustainable recovery from addiction.

People with addiction issues often have other mental health concerns such as anxiety, depression, stress, bipolar disorder, etc. This is called a co-occurring disorder (also known as dual diagnosis) where substance abuse and mental health issues are present together. To recovery successfully from an addiction, it is crucial to treat the mental health issue(s) as well as the addiction, which is what we do at Advantage Mental Health.

Outpatient treatment at Advantage Mental Health Center allows patients to maintain their current lifestyle while seeking treatment and working toward the goal of freedom from addiction. Treatment with medication and counseling/behavioral therapy allows them to live their lives while overcoming addiction… they can still work, attend school, or participate in family events.

We can help you manage and overcome your addiction...through medication based treatment and counseling. There is hope...and we're here to help.

FAQs About Addiction Recovery

  What are the signs of addiction?

People experiment with drugs for many reasons. While most individuals begin using drugs out of curiosity, to have a good time, because friends are doing it, or to ease another problem. Drug use doesn’t always lead to abuse either and there is no clear level at which use can turn from casual to addictive. Once a drug begins to cause problems in your personal or professional life, you likely have a problem. While signs of addiction vary based on the individual especially since most abusers downplay their problem, here are some signs to look for:

Physical Signs

  • Inability to fall or stay asleep
  • Changes or loss of appetite
  • Sudden weight loss or weight gain
  • Deterioration of physical appearance, personal grooming habits
  • Tremors
  • Slurred speech
  • Poor coordination

Behavioral Signs

  • Drop in performance at school or work
  • Unexplained need for additional money or sudden financial problems
  • Change of friends, hangouts, or hobbies
  • Secretive or suspicious behaviors

Emotional Signs

  • Unexplained change in personality or moods
  • Sudden mood swings or angry outbursts
  • Lack of motivation
  • Appears fearful or anxious

  What is Substance Abuse?

Substance abuse is overindulgence or dependence on addictive substances such as alcohol, illicit drugs, and tobacco. Substance abuse is a blanket term covering drug use, drug misuse, alcohol, and other abuses. Any individual who persists in using any drug or alcoholic stimulant despite problems related to the use of substances may be considered addicted and/or abusive of stimulants.

  What are withdrawal symptoms of substance abuse?

Withdrawal occurs differently for each drug and individual. Drugs and alcohol are brain depressants that suppress the brain's production of neurotransmitters like noradrenaline. When you quit using drugs or alcohol, your brain rebounds by producing a surge of adrenaline that causes withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms can include headaches, increased sensitivity to pain, anxiety, depression, insomnia, sweating or hot flashes, flu-like symptoms such as weakness and body aches, and even depression.

  How do you approach treating co-occurring disorders?

People with addiction issues often have other mental health concerns such as anxiety, depression, stress, bipolar disorder, etc. This is called a co-occurring disorder (also known as dual diagnosis) where substance abuse and mental health issues are present together.

People often “self-medicate” with alcohol or drugs because of untreated mental health issues.

To recovery successfully from an addiction, it is crucial to treat the mental health issue(s) as well as the addiction, which is what we do at Advantage Mental Health. Each new patient receives a full psychiatric evaluation and has ample time to explain his/her situation to a caring professional. Treating any underlying issues (such as depression or anxiety) gives the patient the best chance at full recovery.

  How can therapy help with my addiction?

Addiction is a chronic disease that can cripple its victims, making it difficult to stop using. Most patients need long-term or repeated care in order to heal from the abuse. Counseling is an essential part of drug abuse treatment for many victims and their families. In most cases, addiction is more than physical and even after addicts are off drugs and considered cured, most addicts are at a high risk for relapse. Therapy can help individuals recognize triggers such as mood changes, thoughts, and social situations and how they can avoid them.

The skills learned in therapy can last a lifetime helping those who suffer from addiction and their families decrease the chance of relapse.

  Do you provide inpatient addiction treatment services?

We provide outpatient services including appointments with psychiatrists, psychiatric ARNPs, and Certified Addiction Professionals. We can provide Suboxone treatment and can coordinate care for those being discharged from medical detox units or inpatient rehabilitation facilities.

  Do you offer group therapy?

Yes! In addition to individual sessions with our licensed mental health counselor or certified addiction professional we offer a variety of the Skills and Training Groups. New clients need an assessment with the facilitator prior to joining. Please contact our office for meeting days and times.

  • Those in Recovery from Substance or Alcohol Use Disorder
    Addiction is a brain disease that changes how the brain works. These brain changes can last a long time and can hamper a person’s ability to stay “clean and sober” – even though he/she might have a very strong desire to be drug or alcohol free. Find support, learn coping skills and share with others going through similar challenges with their substance use issues under the direction of a certified addiction professional.
  • Family of Those in Recovery Support and Coping
    A chance for family members (parents, spouses, siblings, etc.) to learn about the disease of addiction and how best to support a loved one who is facing the challenges of substance use issues.

  Do you involve family members?

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